Dissociative and Dissociative Identity Disorder humor

May trigger.

I'm not immature... I just have more than one inner child!

If I could get a grip on reality, I’d strangle it —Unknown

Multiple Personality Disorder and Cats… really?

We know that cats can get feline leukemia and feline aids. Cats are subject to mood disorders (e.g., distemper) and adjustment disorders (e.g., peeing on owner’s new lover’s discarded clothing).

Continue reading… Cats with Multiple Personality Disorder

Having DID isn’t all bad…

Having Dissociative Identity Disorder isn't all bad... humor

Having DID isn’t all badhttps://shadowlight8.wordpress.com/2010/02/01/did-is-real-it-can-be-hell-but-it-also-can-be-fun/

Multiple Personality Disorder tax return…

New Tax Form MPD-1040

Certain deductions are available for those who qualify as multiple personalities in the current tax year…

Read more…

Multiple Personality jokes – T-shirts & memes

Source: http://www.coolnsmart.com/tshirt_quotes/

DID T-shirt - if I were making this up it would be a whole lot more interesting

There are six Is in Dissociative Identity Disorder T-shirt

My inner teenager got me grounded

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How many types of Dissociation do you know?

Dissociation takes many different forms, some effect everyday life or affect people every now and then, and other forms of dissociation can lead to distress and/or problems in everyday life. If these other forms of dissociative experiences happen several times – or once, but for an extended period of time – then they become problematic (pathological).

Dissociation can be seen as a spectrum, or more recently tends to be categorized as Normal/Normative, or Pathological Dissociation (i.e., the diagnosable/problematic kind).

How many types of Dissociation do you know? Which are types of normal Dissociation? Which are types of problematic Dissociation?

Types of Normal Dissociation
– Day dreaming
– Spacing out (briefly)
– Absorption (e.g., in a book)
– Highway hypnosis (expected travel with gaps in memory)

Types of Pathological Dissociation
– Numbing (emotional and/or physical) – a symptom of PTSD, Depression and others
Freeze Response – a symptom of PTSD and DID and others, common during trauma
– Out of Body Experiences (form of Depersonalization) – common during trauma, sometimes happens during near-death experiences, may also happen in BPD, and DID
– ‘Wall staring’ (spacing out, common in Depression)
– Trance states (e.g., Dissociative Trance Disorder in the ICD-10 manual, can happen in other disorders)
– Maladaptive day dreaming*
Derealization (either you/the world doesn’t feel real) – a separate diagnosis but also a symptom of BPD, Dissociative PTSD, and DID
Depersonalization (part of all of you doesn’t seem like you) – also symptom of BPD, Dissociative PTSD, and DID
Amnesia (without a physical cause) -a separate diagnosis but also a symptom of PTSD and DID
Fugue states (unexpected travel, sometimes with loss of or change in identity)
– Identity alterations/switching – a symptom of Dissociative Identity Disorder, and OSDD
– Catatonia (can be present in Schizophrenia)
Pseudo Seizures/Psychogenic Non-Epileptic Seizures – dissociative reactions to stressors
Dissociative movement or sensation problems – also known as Functional Neurological Symptom Disorder (FND), or Conversion Disorder
* not currently a diagnosis

Problematic types of dissociation are recognized as mental health problems – and can be either a Dissociative Disorder or a common symptom/experience involved in another kind of mental health problem, such as depression.
Can you think of any which are missing? Leave a comment if you can.

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DDNOS1 and Dissociative Identity Disorder – Do you know the differences?

Dissociative Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (DDNOS) and Other Specified Dissociative Disorder (OSDD)

Dissociative Disorder Not Otherwise Specified was the most commonly diagnosed Dissociative Disorder in the DSM-IV diagnostic manual.[1] DDNOS is a complex dissociative disorder which includes many different groups of dissociative symptoms. The most common presentations of DDNOS are numbered, for example DDNOS1, DDNOS2, etc. The DSM-5 changed the name of DDNOS to Other Specified Dissociative Disorder (OSDD); DDNOS-1 was renamed to OSDD-1.

DDNOS-1 and Other Specified Dissociative Disorder

Dissociative Disorder Not Otherwise Specified (DDNOS) and DID. DDNOS is any significant mix of dissociative symptoms that don't fully fit another Dissociative Disorder - It was renamed to Other Specified Dissociative Disorder in the DSM-5 - DDNOS-1 (DDNOS presentation 1) is very similar to DID. DDNOS 1 is either DDNOS-1a - identity disturbance with less distinct parts than in DID (alter personalities may exist but can't physically take control of the person's body, but strongly influence the person's thoughts and actions and amnesia is present), or DDNOS-1b - distinct dissociative parts (alters identities) exist and can take executive control, but without amnesia, less common - DDNOS may be diagnosed if symptoms are not quite clear enough for DID criteria but are similar - the amnesia needed for DID in the DSM5 has been broadened to "recurrent gaps in the recall of everyday events, important personal information, and/or traumatic events that are inconsistent with ordinary forgetting", meaning amnesia for past trauma alone is enough - symptoms (including alters and amnesia) can be self-reported in the DSM5. height=

DDNOS1 and Dissociative Identity Disorder differences explained and DSM-5 changes to DID.
Information taken from DSM-5 (APA, 2013) and Dissociative Disorders: The DSM-V and beyond (2011).

DDNOS-1 is the most common form of DDNOS, and can be thought of as “partial DID”. [1] The improved wording of the Dissociative Identity Disorder criteria in the DSM-5 will help those incorrectly diagnosed as DDNOS, for instance because of not obviously switching to an alter identity in front of the psychiatrist, be correctly classed as Dissociative Identity Disorder. [1, 2]

References

  1. Dell, P. F., & O’Neil, J. A. (Eds.). (2010).Dissociation and the dissociative disorders: DSM-V and beyond. Routledge. ISBN 1135906033.
  2. American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders: DSM-5. (5th ed.). Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Association. ISBN 0890425574.

Related links

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A Therapist’s Perspective: Reactions to dependency – responses depend on how secure the therapist is

People who support survivors of trauma may react in different ways, depending on how secure they are in their own attachment behavior and relationships. This table identifies therapists‘ typical responses to working with Trauma Survivors. Partners, friends or other supportive people may act in some of these ways, which will also depend on their own understanding of trauma.

Countertransference is a term that refers to how your therapist seems to react toward you. If you are currently finding your therapist responding in ways you find difficult, this may be helpful to discuss in a session.

Therapist reactions and responses to the Dependency of people with Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Dissociative Disorders.

Therapist reactions and responses to the Dependency of people with Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Dissociative Disorders.

Source: Steele, K., van der Hart, O., & Nijenhuis, E. R. (2001). Dependency in the treatment of complex posttraumatic stress disorder and dissociative disorders. Journal of Trauma & Dissociation, 2(4), 79-116. http://www.trauma-pages.com/a/steele-2001.php

Types of Dependency – Extreme, Secure and Counterdependency

This table is a useful tool in assessing both where you are now and what you could aim for to build more secure relationships.

Extreme Dependency, Counterdependency and Secure Dependency behaviors in Complex PTSD and Dissociative Disorders

Extreme Dependency, Counterdependency and Secure Dependency behaviors in Complex PTSD and Dissociative Disorders