Mindfulness protects adults from physical, mental health consequences of childhood abuse, neglect

ACE study – Mindfulness helps protects adults from the consequences of childhood abuse & neglect
Find your Adverse Childhood Experiences Score at http://www.acestudy.org/ace_score

About the Adverse Childhood Experiences Study
http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/acestudy/about.html

Adverse Childhood Experiences Pyramid

ACE pyramid

This blog is based on the following research

Whitaker, R. C., Dearth-Wesley, T., Gooze, R. A., Becker, B. D., Gallagher, K. C., & McEwen, B. S. (2014). Adverse childhood experiences, dispositional mindfulness, and adult health. Preventive Medicine, 67, 147–153. doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2014.07.029

Full paper
http://www.pubfacts.com/detail/25084563/Adverse-childhood-experiences-dispositional-mindfulness-and-adult-health.

ACEs Too High

Aeye2Fact #1: People who were abused and neglected when they were kids have poorer physical and mental health. The more types of ACEs (adverse childhood experiences) – physical abuse, an alcoholic father, an abused mother, etc. – the higher the risk of heart disease, depression, diabetes, obesity, being violent or experiencing violence. Got an ACE score of 4 or more? Your risk of heart disease increases 200%. Your risk of suicide increases 1200%.

Fact #2: Mindfulness practices improve people’s physical and mental health.

Now, says Dr. Robert Whitaker, a pediatrician and professor of pediatrics and public health at Temple University, there’s one more important fact: People who are mindful are physically and mentally healthier, no matter what their ACE scores are.

This study, to be published in the October issue of Preventive Medicine, is the first to look at the relationship between ACEs, mindfulness and health. And it…

View original post 1,865 more words

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One thought on “Mindfulness protects adults from physical, mental health consequences of childhood abuse, neglect

  1. Pingback: Our latest blog posts – don’t miss out! | Trauma and Dissociation Project

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