Key Facts about Dissociative Identity Disorder & Other specified dissociative disorder

Complex dissociative disorders are commonly misunderstood and confused, as well as stereotyped. Both disorders are very similar, as is the treatment. The key misunderstandings often arise from focusing only on Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) and excluding Other Specified Dissociative Disorder (DDNOS), and not understanding the role of dissociative disorders as a psychological defense against overwhelming trauma. Like all dissociative disorders, DID and OSDD they involve

clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational or other important areas of functioning (source: the DSM-5 psychiatric manual, APA, 2013).

Here are some key facts about the Complex Dissociative Disorders (Dissociative Identity Disorder, formerly multiple personality disorder) and Other specified dissociative disorder, formerly DDNOS).

Complex dissociative disorders - Keyfacts

copyright TraumaAndDissociation 2013

DID and Dissociative disorders are not rare - copyright TraumaAndDissociation project 2013, free to distribute unmodified

DID and Dissociative disorders are not rare

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Nov 11, 2013

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8 thoughts on “Key Facts about Dissociative Identity Disorder & Other specified dissociative disorder

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